Everything you need to know about Wineglass Bay and Freycinet National Park. Find out the best things to do, how to get there and where to stay.

People often ask us what are the best things to do in Tasmania? What can we see on the east coast of Tasmania? What is the best way to visit Wineglass Bay? Well you have come to the right place as your common questions are answered right here.

Common questions about Wineglass Bay and Freycinet National Park

Where is Wineglass Bay?

Wineglass Bay is located on the East Coast of Tasmania, within the Freycinet National Park. It is part of a white sand isthmus, hiding in between two red granite mountain ranges. Wineglass Bay sits at the foot of these granite mountains, commonly known as the Hazards.

Red granite mountains, pink granite mountains, we all see the world through different lenses, so it really doesn’t matter which colour you choose to describe them. They are truly awe-inspiring and provide not only an incredible backdrop for photographers but also endless entertainment for rock-climbing, hiking, bushwalking, birdwatching, etc.Wineglass Bay sits at the foot of the granite mountains commonly known as the Hazards. Red granite mountains, pink granite mountains, we all see the world through different lenses, so it really doesn’t matter which colour you choose to describe them. They are truly awe-inspiring and provide not only an incredible backdrop for photographers but also endless entertainment for rock-climbing, hiking, bushwalking, birdwatching, etc.

How far is Wineglass Bay from Hobart? Freycinet National Park is 195km from Hobart. By car the drive is almost 3 hours in duration, allowing for the winding roads and very mixed traffic including adventurous cyclists, large motorhomes, tour buses, rental cars and local farmers moving heavy machinery between their properties.

From Hobart, the Tasman Highway (A3) takes you through Sorell and continues up the east coast to Orford where The Great Eastern Drive officially begins. This highway takes you most of the way until you reach the turn off to Coles Bay Road (C302) just before Bicheno. Coles Bay Road can then be easily followed for 25km through to the township of Coles Bay. From there you will find directions for the world-renowned Freycinet National Park and Wineglass Bay on the clearly marked signs. The Tasmanian Government has spent hundreds of thousand of dollars upgrading the car park near Wineglass Bay but during busy times of the year it can still get pretty crazy and busy. Take care and be patient as you share the road with less experienced users.

Due to the mount of driving involved and challenging traffic conditions, we highly recommend you consider leaving the driving and navigating to an expert. This will allow you to relax and enjoy the amazing coastal scenery.

There is public transport to Coles Bay from Hobart, but it requires catching two buses and the changeover can be confusing. Wineglass Bay Tours offer a great alternative as they can transport you directly and you also get the benefit of an informative and entertaining tour from Hobart to Wineglass Bay. You can book directly with Wineglass Bay Tours HERE

How to get to Wineglass Bay? The remote location of Wineglass Bay is what helps it have the reputation of the best beach in the world. Wineglass Bay can only be accessed by boat or by foot. To visit Wineglass Bay by sea will require a good seaworthy vessel and favourable weather conditions as you must cruise along the eastern side of Freycinet Peninsula, exposed to the Tasman Sea. Hiking to Wineglass Bay takes 1-2 hours to reach the beach from the Wineglass Bay Walk car park.

Is camping allowed at Wineglass Bay? There are many campsites available in the Freycinet National Park at easily accessible spots where you can park a motorhome, plug in your power and kick back. For a more traditional camping experience where you hike in with your tent and food, there is a small campsite at the end of Wineglass Bay Beach.  Campsites are also located at the beautiful Hazards Beach, Cooks Beach and Bryans Beach.  For camping information, check out the Parks and Wildlife Service website. It is important for campers be well prepared and carry all the necessary equipment including tent, bedding, food and water.  Fresh water is sometimes available from nearby creeks, but walkers should never just assume that to be the case as the Freycinet National Park has been in drought conditions for almost 2 years.  There are very simple toilet facilities at the Wineglass Bay Beach campsite, but campers should go prepared with their own toiletries including toilet paper.  Camping inside Freycinet National Park is extremely popular in summer and autumn and is allocated by ballot in August each year so plan and be sure to get your name in the draw.

What is there to do at Freycinet National Park? Aside from walking through the Freycinet National Park and enjoying the crystal-clear water and pristine white sand of beaches such as Wineglass Bay and Hazards Beach, there are so many other things you can do whilst visiting the Freycinet Peninsula. Sea kayaking, fishing, scenic flights, eco-cruises, bird watching, golf, there is even an exciting new paintball facility… the opportunities to get outdoors, have fun and adventure and maximise your Freycinet experience are endless. Below are a few of the special places we recommend visiting before leaving Freycinet National Park.

Honeymoon Bay

It is almost impossible to visit Freycinet National Park and not see Honeymoon Bay. The short drive to Honeymoon Bay is clearly marked as you follow Freycinet Drive towards the Wineglass Bay Walk car park. Honeymoon Bay is a dreamy little corner of Coles Bay, located just around the corner from the Freycinet Lodge.  Honeymoon Bay provides very safe and popular swimming in Freycinet as it faces Great Oyster Bay and is sheltered from the Tasman Sea. The alluring green, blue, turquoise water gently laps onto the tiny granite pebbles on the beach. Pacific Gulls soar above searching for their next feed of shellfish. There is an abundance of small fish swimming around in the water so if you have equipment for snorkelling, this is the place to use it.

Cape Tourville

As you head along Freycinet Drive towards or away from Wineglass Bay Walk car park you will see a turn off called Cape Tourville Rd. Turn here and follow the 7kms of newly sealed road 7kms up the hill. You’ll know when you have arrived at your destination as you will find Cape Tourville Lighthouse towering above and the road stops, turning into a carpark. Watch out for friendly Tasmanian wildlife in this carpark, especially wallabies.
The Cape Tourville Circuit Walk is 600 metres long. It is a flat easy walk and suitable for wheelchairs. Do the circuit in a counterclockwise direction to get the most benefit from the information boards and educational experiences that you will find along the way.

By the end of this 20 minute walk you will have treated yourself to awe-inspiring views of The Hazards mountains and Wineglass Bay from a new perspective, expansive views of Tasmania’s East Coast towards the north including Friendly Beaches,  incredible views across the Tasman Sea and some of the best whale watching in Tasmania. Schools of tuna, pods of dolphin and local resident white-bellied sea eagles are also often seen from here.

Hazards Beach

One of the most common questions asked by people at the Wineglass Bay Lookout is “What is that beach other there?” as they point their finger in a southerly direction and focus on the gorgeous white sand beach which crystal clear blue and green water on the opposite side of the sand isthmus to Wineglass Bay. The answer is Hazards Beach. Hazards Lagoon lies in between Wineglass Bay and Hazards Beach. Hazards Beach can be accessed from two different directions. You can take the Wineglass Bay and Hazards Beach Circuit track, or you can do the Wineglass Bay Walk that most people choose and once you reach the foot of the granite hills and spend time on Wineglass Bay Beach, take the track towards Hazards Lagoon which will lead you across the isthmus and over to Hazards Beach.

Wineglass Bay sits at the foot of the granite mountains commonly known as the Hazards. Red granite mountains, pink granite mountains, we all see the world through different lenses, so it really doesn’t matter which colour you choose to describe them. They are truly awe-inspiring and provide not only an incredible backdrop for photographers but also endless entertainment for rock-climbing, hiking, bushwalking, birdwatching, etc.

Book with Wineglass Bay Tours the East Coast Specialists

The Guides at Wineglass Bay Tours are true locals who know all the greatest places and secrets of this magical part of the world.  Let them share it all with you as they proudly showcase their island home.

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